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on the juice

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still on the road, and still internet-challenged. just a quick post today to start a discussion: how will you feel about the cardinal players whose names appear on the list of big-leaguers who tested positive for steroids back in 2003? there are 100 guys on that roster; every organization is going to be implicated. and the names are surely going to come out.

my own opinion: widespread disclosure is the best thing that can possibly happen. the airing of the truth is long overdue. it has been delayed because players understandably don't want to name names; even those individuals who've wanted to talk frankly about this haven't been able to do it heretofore, lest they risk exposing the secrets of current / former teammates. but now the secrets are out, or are about to be; that should provide everybody with some cover. players who want to participate in a candid discussion about this will now be free to do so without tattle-taling, and with less fear that they will be singled out and shunned and/or prosecuted. when you're one of 100 cheaters, rather than one of a handful, it's clear that the cheating is systemic --- and the fault lies with the system as much as (prob'y more than) with the individuals who decided to cheat.

i'll forgive any cardinal player whose name appears on the list if he takes responsibility for what he did and helps all of us understand how the system broke down. i mean, we already know how it broke down --- steroid use was tacitly approved by everybody involved in the game, from the owners to the union to the gms and managers to the sportswriters and, yes, the fans. but we need that story to be told in as much detail as possible before we can move beyond it. it's a terrible, awful story, in my opinion; i disagree with those who believe the steroid scandal is no big deal, who think it's merely trumped up by media types hungry for a Big Story or by power-abusing authoritarians in the government. in the end, sports are about sportsmanship; that's why we care. or why i do, anyway. and baseball's steroid era represents an industry-wide breakdown in that value.

it happened; let's quit pretending that it didn't, or that it doesn't matter. we need to talk honestly about that failure, in which all of us shared, and get it over with. then we can move forward. any cardinal named as a steroid user who can help achieve that will still have my respect.